Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

06_Winter_travel_p_19-24.pdf

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title Winter Travel
creator Stewart, Deborah and David
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Before the Islands autos left their blocks to travel salted roads, and giant snowplows prowled the highways, winter travel meant sleighs, slews, and pitches, and perilous but time-saving journeys across icey bays and harbours. Winter had a different vocabulary then. There was top ice and double ice, rotten and honey-combed ice. Folks spoke of glib ice and ice with ridges, and channel ice and bushed ice. As roadways invariably drifted full, new paths wandered over fields, following the easiest-travelled snowy contours. New roads were made, first broken through fresh snow and then packed firm and built up. Increasing traffic created deepergrowing dips known as pitches, lending traffic a roller coaster effect. Where sleighs became unbalanced and slid sideways, slews developed. As the slews became more treacherous, actual sleigh upsets threatened. Best, though, to let people who remember tell it in their own words:
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1979
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-98
source 07
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title Winter Travel
creator Stewart, Deborah and David
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Before the Islands autos left their blocks to travel salted roads, and giant snowplows prowled the highways, winter travel meant sleighs, slews, and pitches, and perilous but time-saving journeys across icey bays and harbours. Winter had a different vocabulary then. There was top ice and double ice, rotten and honey-combed ice. Folks spoke of glib ice and ice with ridges, and channel ice and bushed ice. As roadways invariably drifted full, new paths wandered over fields, following the easiest-travelled snowy contours. New roads were made, first broken through fresh snow and then packed firm and built up. Increasing traffic created deepergrowing dips known as pitches, lending traffic a roller coaster effect. Where sleighs became unbalanced and slid sideways, slews developed. As the slews became more treacherous, actual sleigh upsets threatened. Best, though, to let people who remember tell it in their own words:
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1979
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-98
source 07
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.