Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

09_Presents...both_numerous_and_costly_p_32-38.pdf

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title Presents...Both Numerous and Costly
creator Eliot, C.W.J.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p>For three and a half weeks, beginning<br />on Monday, 15 July 1850,<br />the world's most acclaimed contemporary<br />statue, The Greek Slave by Hiram<br />Powers, was exhibited to an admiring<br />public in Montreal. The writer for the<br />Montreal Gazette caught the excitement<br />of those days when he described<br />the statue as "the most exquisitely<br />chaste and perfect model of the human<br />form that has been ever executed." In<br />the context of such extravagant praise<br />and the statue's almost universal fame<br />— reflections of Victorian taste —, it is<br />easy to understand the popularity of<br />small reproductions of The Greek Slave<br />in Parian ware, and advertisements for<br />their sale in both Montreal and<br />Toronto. But this particular artistic<br />rage subsided by the end of the 19th<br />century.<br />What follows is the story, mostly<br />factual, occasionally conjectural, of one<br />of those Parian statuettes, of the two<br />families who owned it, and of those<br />matters of taste that it still raises.</p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1996
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-522
source 39
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>

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title Presents...Both Numerous and Costly
creator Eliot, C.W.J.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p>For three and a half weeks, beginning<br />on Monday, 15 July 1850,<br />the world's most acclaimed contemporary<br />statue, The Greek Slave by Hiram<br />Powers, was exhibited to an admiring<br />public in Montreal. The writer for the<br />Montreal Gazette caught the excitement<br />of those days when he described<br />the statue as "the most exquisitely<br />chaste and perfect model of the human<br />form that has been ever executed." In<br />the context of such extravagant praise<br />and the statue's almost universal fame<br />— reflections of Victorian taste —, it is<br />easy to understand the popularity of<br />small reproductions of The Greek Slave<br />in Parian ware, and advertisements for<br />their sale in both Montreal and<br />Toronto. But this particular artistic<br />rage subsided by the end of the 19th<br />century.<br />What follows is the story, mostly<br />factual, occasionally conjectural, of one<br />of those Parian statuettes, of the two<br />families who owned it, and of those<br />matters of taste that it still raises.</p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1996
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-522
source 39
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>