Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

06_The_saga_of_Alexis_Doiron_p_12-18.pdf

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title The Saga of Alexis Doiron
creator Arsenault, Georges
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p>Without a doubt, the Deportation constitutes the piv-<br />otal point in the history of the Acadians. It is impossible<br />to grasp the full scope of this human tragedy, which<br />drastically changed the course, not only of this people, but<br />of the whole Maritime region. In terms of numbers, we<br />know that between 1755 and 1763, approximately 10,000<br />Acadians were dispossessed of their lands in the territory<br />that now comprises Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and<br />Prince Edward Island, and were deported by the British to<br />the American Thirteen Colonies, Britain, and France. A<br />great many of the victims perished during the ordeal. The<br />toll was particularly heavy among those deported from lie<br />Saint Jean in 1758: two-thirds appear to have succumbed<br />during the crossing of the Atlantic or in the months following<br />their arrival in France. The Acadians call this sad period<br />of their history "le Grand Derangement" (the Great<br />Upheaval). The phrase refers not only to the actual<br />Deportation, but also to the Acadians' lengthy wanderings<br />in search of a new homeland, a search that lasted, in many<br />instances, until the early 1800s.</p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1996
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-519
source 39
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>

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title The Saga of Alexis Doiron
creator Arsenault, Georges
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p>Without a doubt, the Deportation constitutes the piv-<br />otal point in the history of the Acadians. It is impossible<br />to grasp the full scope of this human tragedy, which<br />drastically changed the course, not only of this people, but<br />of the whole Maritime region. In terms of numbers, we<br />know that between 1755 and 1763, approximately 10,000<br />Acadians were dispossessed of their lands in the territory<br />that now comprises Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and<br />Prince Edward Island, and were deported by the British to<br />the American Thirteen Colonies, Britain, and France. A<br />great many of the victims perished during the ordeal. The<br />toll was particularly heavy among those deported from lie<br />Saint Jean in 1758: two-thirds appear to have succumbed<br />during the crossing of the Atlantic or in the months following<br />their arrival in France. The Acadians call this sad period<br />of their history "le Grand Derangement" (the Great<br />Upheaval). The phrase refers not only to the actual<br />Deportation, but also to the Acadians' lengthy wanderings<br />in search of a new homeland, a search that lasted, in many<br />instances, until the early 1800s.</p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1996
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-519
source 39
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>