Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

07_Bill_Reids_war_p_26-31.pdf

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title Bill Reid's War
creator Kennedy, Earle
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p>Soldiers in World War II called<br />it "the sharp end." It was<br />where the guns and infantry<br />of one army met the guns and infantry<br />of their enemy. If that war is boiled<br />down to its essence, the "sharp end" is<br />where the outcome was decided.<br />For all its importance, the sharp<br />end was a surprisingly unpopulated<br />place. This was because modern<br />armies required a huge "tail" of logistical<br />and other support troops. The<br />Allied armies, for example, needed 12<br />rear echelon personnel to keep one<br />combat infantryman in the battle line.<br />It was also a dangerous place. The<br />overall casualty rate for Allied armies<br />in World War II was around 16%. The<br />rate for combat infantrymen, however,<br />was closer to 50% The rate for combat<br />infantry officers was even higher.</p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1995
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-508
source 38
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>

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title Bill Reid's War
creator Kennedy, Earle
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p>Soldiers in World War II called<br />it "the sharp end." It was<br />where the guns and infantry<br />of one army met the guns and infantry<br />of their enemy. If that war is boiled<br />down to its essence, the "sharp end" is<br />where the outcome was decided.<br />For all its importance, the sharp<br />end was a surprisingly unpopulated<br />place. This was because modern<br />armies required a huge "tail" of logistical<br />and other support troops. The<br />Allied armies, for example, needed 12<br />rear echelon personnel to keep one<br />combat infantryman in the battle line.<br />It was also a dangerous place. The<br />overall casualty rate for Allied armies<br />in World War II was around 16%. The<br />rate for combat infantrymen, however,<br />was closer to 50% The rate for combat<br />infantry officers was even higher.</p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1995
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-508
source 38
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>