Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

06_Season_of_scarcity_p_20-22.pdf

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title Season of Scarcity
creator Beck, Boyde
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p>On 10 April 1815, Mount Tarnbora,<br />a large volcano in the<br />Sunda Islands (now part of Indonesia),<br />began to tear itself apart. For two days<br />the island shook from the force of the<br />biggest eruption in recorded history.<br />Explosions were heard 1,800 kilometres<br />away. In Java, 500 kilometres distant,<br />British authorities thought the<br />sound was pirates' cannon fire, and<br />sent gunboats to investigate. Fifteen<br />centimetre stones came to earth 40<br />kilometres away. An unnatural nightfall<br />descended under a thick cloud of<br />dust 1,000 kilometres wide. Tambora<br />lost 1,400 metres in height over those<br />two days. A crater 12 kilometres wide<br />appeared at its centre. The immediate<br />death toll from rockfall, ashfall, gas,<br />and tsunami, approached 10,000 people.<br />Over the next few months, nearby<br />islands would lose another 80,000 people<br />to cholera and famine.</p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1994
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-481
source 36
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>

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title Season of Scarcity
creator Beck, Boyde
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p>On 10 April 1815, Mount Tarnbora,<br />a large volcano in the<br />Sunda Islands (now part of Indonesia),<br />began to tear itself apart. For two days<br />the island shook from the force of the<br />biggest eruption in recorded history.<br />Explosions were heard 1,800 kilometres<br />away. In Java, 500 kilometres distant,<br />British authorities thought the<br />sound was pirates' cannon fire, and<br />sent gunboats to investigate. Fifteen<br />centimetre stones came to earth 40<br />kilometres away. An unnatural nightfall<br />descended under a thick cloud of<br />dust 1,000 kilometres wide. Tambora<br />lost 1,400 metres in height over those<br />two days. A crater 12 kilometres wide<br />appeared at its centre. The immediate<br />death toll from rockfall, ashfall, gas,<br />and tsunami, approached 10,000 people.<br />Over the next few months, nearby<br />islands would lose another 80,000 people<br />to cholera and famine.</p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1994
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-481
source 36
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>