Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

13_Thomas_Irwin_champion_p_13-16.pdf

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title Thomas Irwin: Champion of the Micmacs
creator L.F.S. Upton
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description There were about three hundred Micmac Indians on Prince Edward Island in the early decades of the nineteenth century. That is, about three hundred at any one time, for the native people continued to move freely over their tribal lands in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Gaspe peninsula. Small quantities of land were reserved for them in the other colonies, but none in Prince Edward Island. Practically the whole island had been granted to favourites of the British Crown in 1767. A few Indians lived year round at Lennox Island, on the sufferance of one of the proprietors, and there they gathered for the St. Ann's Day festivities each July. The colonial government had almost no Crown lands to call its own and, even with the best will in the world, would have been hardpressed to find a place to establish an Indian reserve. Not that the best will in the world was apparent, for conventional wisdom held that the Indians were doomed to die out completely and, this being so, there was little point in making any exertions to save them.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1977
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-47
source 03
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title Thomas Irwin: Champion of the Micmacs
creator L.F.S. Upton
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description There were about three hundred Micmac Indians on Prince Edward Island in the early decades of the nineteenth century. That is, about three hundred at any one time, for the native people continued to move freely over their tribal lands in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Gaspe peninsula. Small quantities of land were reserved for them in the other colonies, but none in Prince Edward Island. Practically the whole island had been granted to favourites of the British Crown in 1767. A few Indians lived year round at Lennox Island, on the sufferance of one of the proprietors, and there they gathered for the St. Ann's Day festivities each July. The colonial government had almost no Crown lands to call its own and, even with the best will in the world, would have been hardpressed to find a place to establish an Indian reserve. Not that the best will in the world was apparent, for conventional wisdom held that the Indians were doomed to die out completely and, this being so, there was little point in making any exertions to save them.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1977
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-47
source 03
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.