Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

08_The_beaver_on_Prince_Edward_Island_p_18-22.pdf

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title The Beaver on Prince Edward Island
creator Dibblee, Randy
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p>It is supposed that beavers inhabited many of<br />the streams of this province before man, the<br />arch-enemy appeared on the scene. The late<br />Dr. Caven, * we are told, discovered traces of<br />beaver dams on Dunk River. It is evident<br />that our climate and natural conditions are<br />favorable to the existence of this valuable<br />and harmless furbearer. There are many<br />acres of low lands that are absolutely valueless<br />and which could be used very profitably<br />as beaver ranches. The animals provide for<br />themselves, do no damage to property, their<br />food and the material they use for their dams<br />and huts consisting almost exclusively of the<br />small sapling trees growing on the banks of<br />the streams in which they live.</p><p>Charlottetown Guardian, 31 October</p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1994
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-469
source 35
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>

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title The Beaver on Prince Edward Island
creator Dibblee, Randy
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p>It is supposed that beavers inhabited many of<br />the streams of this province before man, the<br />arch-enemy appeared on the scene. The late<br />Dr. Caven, * we are told, discovered traces of<br />beaver dams on Dunk River. It is evident<br />that our climate and natural conditions are<br />favorable to the existence of this valuable<br />and harmless furbearer. There are many<br />acres of low lands that are absolutely valueless<br />and which could be used very profitably<br />as beaver ranches. The animals provide for<br />themselves, do no damage to property, their<br />food and the material they use for their dams<br />and huts consisting almost exclusively of the<br />small sapling trees growing on the banks of<br />the streams in which they live.</p><p>Charlottetown Guardian, 31 October</p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1994
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-469
source 35
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>