Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

10_Montgomery-s_lands_1833_p_33-39.pdf

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title Montgomery's Lands 1833
creator Lawson, James P.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p>Estate records, where they exist,<br />can be a godsend for the genealogist<br />trying to trace ancestors through<br />Prince Edward Island's early British<br />period. For example, between 1798 and<br />1841, when the bulk of the Island's<br />immigrants arrived, there was no nominal<br />census taken in the colony.* The records<br />kept by early proprietors or their agents<br />are points of light amid these statistical<br />shadows.** And when they chronicle a<br />large holding such as the Montgomery<br />Estate, they become even more valuable.</p><p>In the Great Lottery of 1767, which divided<br />up the Island of St. John among various<br />friends of the Crown, the Lord Advocate<br />of Scotland, Sir James Montgomery,<br />drew Lot 7. Three years later he had added<br />Lots 30,34,51, and 36. By 1775, the estate<br />included half of Lot 12 and two-thirds of Lot<br />59 as well, over 100,000 acres in all.</p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1992
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-433
source 32
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>

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title Montgomery's Lands 1833
creator Lawson, James P.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p>Estate records, where they exist,<br />can be a godsend for the genealogist<br />trying to trace ancestors through<br />Prince Edward Island's early British<br />period. For example, between 1798 and<br />1841, when the bulk of the Island's<br />immigrants arrived, there was no nominal<br />census taken in the colony.* The records<br />kept by early proprietors or their agents<br />are points of light amid these statistical<br />shadows.** And when they chronicle a<br />large holding such as the Montgomery<br />Estate, they become even more valuable.</p><p>In the Great Lottery of 1767, which divided<br />up the Island of St. John among various<br />friends of the Crown, the Lord Advocate<br />of Scotland, Sir James Montgomery,<br />drew Lot 7. Three years later he had added<br />Lots 30,34,51, and 36. By 1775, the estate<br />included half of Lot 12 and two-thirds of Lot<br />59 as well, over 100,000 acres in all.</p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1992
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-433
source 32
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>