Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

05_Things_that_slither_p_12-14.pdf

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title Things That Slither
creator MacQuarrie, Ian
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p><font size="3" face="Times-Roman"><font size="3" face="Times-Roman"><p align="left">For lovers of reptilia, Prince Edward</p><p align="left">Island is a desolate place. Turtles</p><p align="left">and tortoises are unknown. Alligators</p><p align="left">and crocodiles are distant memories.</p><p align="left">There are no lizards. We do, however,</p><p align="left">have relatively low populations of a few</p><p align="left">kinds of snakes.</p><p align="left">While our eyes may long for things</p><p align="left">that slither, it is an uncommon day that</p><p align="left">provides such visions. Even in Island</p><p align="left">place names, snakes suffer anonymity.</p><p align="left">We acknowledge a few mammals, the</p><p align="left">odd insect, even an amphibian or two —</p><p align="left">but no Rattlesnake Rock, no Black Snake</p><p align="left">Crossing, no Garter Snake Road. Perhaps</p><p align="left">this is simply indicative of the (generally</p><p align="left">biased) outlook of humans toward</p><p align="left">their distant cousins, or, more charitably,</p><p>it is simply oversight.</p></font></font></p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1990
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-369
source 28
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>

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title Things That Slither
creator MacQuarrie, Ian
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description <p><font size="3" face="Times-Roman"><font size="3" face="Times-Roman"><p align="left">For lovers of reptilia, Prince Edward</p><p align="left">Island is a desolate place. Turtles</p><p align="left">and tortoises are unknown. Alligators</p><p align="left">and crocodiles are distant memories.</p><p align="left">There are no lizards. We do, however,</p><p align="left">have relatively low populations of a few</p><p align="left">kinds of snakes.</p><p align="left">While our eyes may long for things</p><p align="left">that slither, it is an uncommon day that</p><p align="left">provides such visions. Even in Island</p><p align="left">place names, snakes suffer anonymity.</p><p align="left">We acknowledge a few mammals, the</p><p align="left">odd insect, even an amphibian or two —</p><p align="left">but no Rattlesnake Rock, no Black Snake</p><p align="left">Crossing, no Garter Snake Road. Perhaps</p><p align="left">this is simply indicative of the (generally</p><p align="left">biased) outlook of humans toward</p><p align="left">their distant cousins, or, more charitably,</p><p>it is simply oversight.</p></font></font></p>
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1990
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-369
source 28
language en_US
rights <p>Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.</p>