Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

06_Parliamentary_privilege_and_electoral_p_15-21.pdf

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title Parliamentary Privilege and Electoral Disputes on Colonial Prince Edward Island
creator Bumsted, J. M.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description In Part One of his article, published in Number 26, Professor Bumsted outlined the evolution of parliamentary privilege and the role played in it by electoral disputes. In Part Two, he presents us with five case-histories. Most of the cases that were singled out for detailed consideration by the House raised issues that passed beyond mere partisanship. Typically, the spotlighted election disputes illustrated the failure of the existing electoral structure in one or more particulars, often after a major shift in law, political practice, or electoral procedure. Frequently, they contributed to modifications of the existing system. Of the many cases discussed in the assembly journals after 1801, when the assembly gained full control over the election of its members, five seem particularly revealing: the King's County election of 1831; the Belfast elections of 1846-47; and three elections held in 1859, including the Georgetown election of that year.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1990
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-357
source 27
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title Parliamentary Privilege and Electoral Disputes on Colonial Prince Edward Island
creator Bumsted, J. M.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description In Part One of his article, published in Number 26, Professor Bumsted outlined the evolution of parliamentary privilege and the role played in it by electoral disputes. In Part Two, he presents us with five case-histories. Most of the cases that were singled out for detailed consideration by the House raised issues that passed beyond mere partisanship. Typically, the spotlighted election disputes illustrated the failure of the existing electoral structure in one or more particulars, often after a major shift in law, political practice, or electoral procedure. Frequently, they contributed to modifications of the existing system. Of the many cases discussed in the assembly journals after 1801, when the assembly gained full control over the election of its members, five seem particularly revealing: the King's County election of 1831; the Belfast elections of 1846-47; and three elections held in 1859, including the Georgetown election of that year.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1990
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-357
source 27
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.