Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

04_The_search_for_port_la_joye_p_3-8.pdf

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title The Search for Port la Joye
creator Ferguson, Rob
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Such accidents are not uncommon in Island history. While crossing the North River in April 1737, a treacherous season for travellers, Michel Hache- Gallant broke through the rotting ice and drowned. At his death Gallant was in his mid-70s the patriarch of a large, extended family of Acadian colonists, and had spent 17 years in the French settlement of Port La Joye on fie Saint-Jean. Besides his considerable progeny, he left behind a farm near the colony's administrative headquarters. Eightyears later New England militiamen put it to the torch. Two and a half centuries later, in 1987 and 1988, a team of archaeologists from the Canadian Parks Service located and unearthed a dwelling on Hache-Gallant's land, seeking insights into the first French settlement on Prince Edward Island.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1990
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-355
source 27
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title The Search for Port la Joye
creator Ferguson, Rob
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Such accidents are not uncommon in Island history. While crossing the North River in April 1737, a treacherous season for travellers, Michel Hache- Gallant broke through the rotting ice and drowned. At his death Gallant was in his mid-70s the patriarch of a large, extended family of Acadian colonists, and had spent 17 years in the French settlement of Port La Joye on fie Saint-Jean. Besides his considerable progeny, he left behind a farm near the colony's administrative headquarters. Eightyears later New England militiamen put it to the torch. Two and a half centuries later, in 1987 and 1988, a team of archaeologists from the Canadian Parks Service located and unearthed a dwelling on Hache-Gallant's land, seeking insights into the first French settlement on Prince Edward Island.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1990
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-355
source 27
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.