Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

07_Parliamentary_privilege_and_p_22-26.pdf

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title Parliamentary Privilege and Electoral Disputes on Colonial Prince Edward Island
creator Bumsted, J. M.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description In 1831, William Cooper, former land agent for Lord James Townshend, ran as a candidate for the House of Assembly in a by-election in King's County. He finished his campaign on 20 July at St. Peter's, hiding in the loft of a barn adjacent to the polling place. Below him in the darkened barn, a dozen men searched for him with angry expressions and threats. "Damn him," cried one, "he is here — send him out, send him out— we'll have him." Cooper was a refugee from an election riot that had been building like summer thunder throughout the day. His pursuers did not find him, and order was finally restored by special constables brandishing clubs. The polling could not be completed.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1989
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-345
source 26
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title Parliamentary Privilege and Electoral Disputes on Colonial Prince Edward Island
creator Bumsted, J. M.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description In 1831, William Cooper, former land agent for Lord James Townshend, ran as a candidate for the House of Assembly in a by-election in King's County. He finished his campaign on 20 July at St. Peter's, hiding in the loft of a barn adjacent to the polling place. Below him in the darkened barn, a dozen men searched for him with angry expressions and threats. "Damn him," cried one, "he is here — send him out, send him out— we'll have him." Cooper was a refugee from an election riot that had been building like summer thunder throughout the day. His pursuers did not find him, and order was finally restored by special constables brandishing clubs. The polling could not be completed.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1989
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-345
source 26
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.