Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

08_The_Ubiquitous_hare_p_29-34.pdf

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title The Ubiquitous Hare
creator Curley, Rosemary
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description It is hard to define what at t ract s attention to the snowshoe hare. Compared to many familiar mammals, hares appear to live singularly humdrum lives. They do not migrate over long distances, do not store food in cheek pouches, are not ferocious or cunning, cannot climb trees, and never hurl themselves over cliffs into the sea. Nevertheless, we are very much aware of hares. Next to the skunk — considered something of a suburbanite — they are perhaps our most visible wild mammal. Even the most myopic observers cannot fail to notice them feeding along the roadsides in the summer twilight. In winter, their tell-tale t racks are a constant reminder that the woods are full of unseen hares.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1989
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-333
source 25
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title The Ubiquitous Hare
creator Curley, Rosemary
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description It is hard to define what at t ract s attention to the snowshoe hare. Compared to many familiar mammals, hares appear to live singularly humdrum lives. They do not migrate over long distances, do not store food in cheek pouches, are not ferocious or cunning, cannot climb trees, and never hurl themselves over cliffs into the sea. Nevertheless, we are very much aware of hares. Next to the skunk — considered something of a suburbanite — they are perhaps our most visible wild mammal. Even the most myopic observers cannot fail to notice them feeding along the roadsides in the summer twilight. In winter, their tell-tale t racks are a constant reminder that the woods are full of unseen hares.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1989
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-333
source 25
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.