Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

05_The_Survivor_the_wreck_and_p_11-13.pdf

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title The Survivor: The Wreck and Salvage of the Turret Bell
creator Townshend, Adele
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description As ships go, the Turret Bell was an ugly duckling. Her unattractiveness did not lay so much in her dimensions (2211 gross tons, with a length of 237 feet, and a beam of 40 feet), as in her appearance. She was, in fact, a freak of naval architecture, something called a whaleback steamer. The whaleback design had evolved on the Great Lakes in the 1890s. As the English marine magazine, Shipping Wonders of the World observes, the whaleback "was an extremely ugly ship, and looked as if she really were a whale as she lifted her almost cylindrical hull, with its blunt snout bow, out of the water. It was claimed that this hull would save forty per cent in fuel costs and sixty per cent in fuel, but at sea it was a failure and was scarcely more successful on the Great Lakes." The Turret Bell had shared in that failure. Launched from Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1894, she had been relegated by 1906 to coastal trading.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1988
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-316
source 24
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title The Survivor: The Wreck and Salvage of the Turret Bell
creator Townshend, Adele
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description As ships go, the Turret Bell was an ugly duckling. Her unattractiveness did not lay so much in her dimensions (2211 gross tons, with a length of 237 feet, and a beam of 40 feet), as in her appearance. She was, in fact, a freak of naval architecture, something called a whaleback steamer. The whaleback design had evolved on the Great Lakes in the 1890s. As the English marine magazine, Shipping Wonders of the World observes, the whaleback "was an extremely ugly ship, and looked as if she really were a whale as she lifted her almost cylindrical hull, with its blunt snout bow, out of the water. It was claimed that this hull would save forty per cent in fuel costs and sixty per cent in fuel, but at sea it was a failure and was scarcely more successful on the Great Lakes." The Turret Bell had shared in that failure. Launched from Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1894, she had been relegated by 1906 to coastal trading.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1988
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-316
source 24
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.