Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

08_Bear_facts_the_history_and_folklore_p_27-31.pdf

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title Bear Facts: The History and Folklore of Island Bears Part Two
creator Hornby, Jim
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Despite their large size (even the volume of their breath could give them away as they hibernated in snowcovered dens), and the constant encroachment of civilization on their ranges, Island bears could feel, with Mark Twain, that reports of their death were greatly exaggerated during the 19th century. In 1806, John Stewart wrote that "in less than half a century, I have no doubt but the bears will be entirely extirpated." John MacGregor wrote in 1828 that "they are now much reduced in number and rarely met with"; 11 years later, S. S. Hill opined that "they will soon disappear." In the 1850s, Isabella Lucy Bird, author of The English Woman in America, observed that "Bears, which used to be a great attraction to the more adventurous class of sportsman, are, however, rapidly disappearing"; but since the lady spent most of her Island visit in Charlottetown, we can be certain only that the animals avoided city streets.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1988
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-306
source 23
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title Bear Facts: The History and Folklore of Island Bears Part Two
creator Hornby, Jim
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Despite their large size (even the volume of their breath could give them away as they hibernated in snowcovered dens), and the constant encroachment of civilization on their ranges, Island bears could feel, with Mark Twain, that reports of their death were greatly exaggerated during the 19th century. In 1806, John Stewart wrote that "in less than half a century, I have no doubt but the bears will be entirely extirpated." John MacGregor wrote in 1828 that "they are now much reduced in number and rarely met with"; 11 years later, S. S. Hill opined that "they will soon disappear." In the 1850s, Isabella Lucy Bird, author of The English Woman in America, observed that "Bears, which used to be a great attraction to the more adventurous class of sportsman, are, however, rapidly disappearing"; but since the lady spent most of her Island visit in Charlottetown, we can be certain only that the animals avoided city streets.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1988
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-306
source 23
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.