Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

06_Wild_in_the_city_urban_botany_p_16-18.pdf

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title Wild in the City: Urban Botany
creator Griffin, Diane
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description What creatures are these, perfuming the night air with their subtle scents, surviving only by stealth and subterfuge? They are resilient and street-smart and tenacious. They are the plants of the city. We mean here the true city plants —not the pampered and manicured inhabitants of lawn and flowerbed — but the forgotten denizens of back-yards and alleys. They raise their dirty faces from ash heaps and cracks in the pavement. Not for them the cozy ambiance of clipped hedges and spotless gravel walks; their homes are littered with Lysol cans and broken wine bottles. They are not watered with considerate hoses, but by roof-drips and rainfall and wandering drunks. Their soil is not conditioned and balanced. Their insect pests are not attacked with all the miracles of modern chemistry. And yet, they survive, with Promethean indifference to humans and their ways.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1988
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-304
source 23
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title Wild in the City: Urban Botany
creator Griffin, Diane
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description What creatures are these, perfuming the night air with their subtle scents, surviving only by stealth and subterfuge? They are resilient and street-smart and tenacious. They are the plants of the city. We mean here the true city plants —not the pampered and manicured inhabitants of lawn and flowerbed — but the forgotten denizens of back-yards and alleys. They raise their dirty faces from ash heaps and cracks in the pavement. Not for them the cozy ambiance of clipped hedges and spotless gravel walks; their homes are littered with Lysol cans and broken wine bottles. They are not watered with considerate hoses, but by roof-drips and rainfall and wandering drunks. Their soil is not conditioned and balanced. Their insect pests are not attacked with all the miracles of modern chemistry. And yet, they survive, with Promethean indifference to humans and their ways.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1988
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-304
source 23
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.