Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

07_The_Peoples_forest_p_20-28.pdf

Description

View


View Document

MetaData

title The People's Forest
creator McAskill, J. Dan
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description In recent times it has been called the "Garden of the Gulf," a living mosaic of fields, woods, and streams. But to its first European settlers Prince Edward Island was a land of "interminable" forest. All early accounts agree that the forest covered virtually the entire land mass. It created the soil fertility that was exploited by those who cleared and farmed the land. It was the larder for much of the settler's food and medicines; the source of heat for cooking, warmth, and industrial development; and the most indomitable foe to those who struggled first to clear it and then to combat its encroachment. The story of the forest's conversion to the present-day "Garden of the Gulf is inextricably tied to the settlement and development of the Island.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1987
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-292
source 22
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

Read Online

Object Details

View

MetaData

title The People's Forest
creator McAskill, J. Dan
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description In recent times it has been called the "Garden of the Gulf," a living mosaic of fields, woods, and streams. But to its first European settlers Prince Edward Island was a land of "interminable" forest. All early accounts agree that the forest covered virtually the entire land mass. It created the soil fertility that was exploited by those who cleared and farmed the land. It was the larder for much of the settler's food and medicines; the source of heat for cooking, warmth, and industrial development; and the most indomitable foe to those who struggled first to clear it and then to combat its encroachment. The story of the forest's conversion to the present-day "Garden of the Gulf is inextricably tied to the settlement and development of the Island.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1987
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-292
source 22
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.