Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

06_Plagues_of_mice_p_15-18.pdf

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title Plagues of Mice...
creator MacQuarrie, Ian
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description It was inevitable that early settlers on this Island should have had a most difficult time. Isolation and unfamiliarity with a n ew world and its ways made for poor beginnings. In many cases, hunger, cold, and disease provided fairly rapid conclusions. A heroic heritage was thus fashioned for the edification of generations to come.* Although still-abundant wildlife provided food and clothing in the early days, some species could also be quite dangerous to human life. The mind conjures images of slavering bears lurking behind, most big trees, or perhaps even wolves stalking the intrepid ancestor through the winter drifts. Nothing could be further from the truth: large animals presented minor problems. The real danger came from mice.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1987
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-277
source 21
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title Plagues of Mice...
creator MacQuarrie, Ian
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description It was inevitable that early settlers on this Island should have had a most difficult time. Isolation and unfamiliarity with a n ew world and its ways made for poor beginnings. In many cases, hunger, cold, and disease provided fairly rapid conclusions. A heroic heritage was thus fashioned for the edification of generations to come.* Although still-abundant wildlife provided food and clothing in the early days, some species could also be quite dangerous to human life. The mind conjures images of slavering bears lurking behind, most big trees, or perhaps even wolves stalking the intrepid ancestor through the winter drifts. Nothing could be further from the truth: large animals presented minor problems. The real danger came from mice.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1987
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-277
source 21
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.