Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

05_John_Hatch_town_crier_p_12-14.pdf

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title John Hatch: Town Crier
creator Hornby, Jim
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description John Hatch, Town Crier, was a minor civic official in mid- Victorian Charlottetown whose colourful occupation made him a prominent personage. Serving as Crier for about 30 years, Hatch was the last to pursue this ancient trade on Prince Edward Island. His career illustrates the small market-town aspect of the Island capital a century and more ago. During the 18th and much of the 19th century, the trade of crier answered a real need in the Island's capital. As the Island's judicial and government centre, Charlottetown produced most of the official news. Although there were a number of weekly newspapers, they lacked immediacy—and in any case, most of the population was illiterate. Handbills were used to announce auctions and entertainments, but they had similar limitations. Criers have commonly been found in world civilizations, since even tribal communities needed a formal, oral channel of communication with their members. However, both Mr. Hatch and the customs of "crying" that he followed derived from England.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1987
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-276
source 21
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title John Hatch: Town Crier
creator Hornby, Jim
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description John Hatch, Town Crier, was a minor civic official in mid- Victorian Charlottetown whose colourful occupation made him a prominent personage. Serving as Crier for about 30 years, Hatch was the last to pursue this ancient trade on Prince Edward Island. His career illustrates the small market-town aspect of the Island capital a century and more ago. During the 18th and much of the 19th century, the trade of crier answered a real need in the Island's capital. As the Island's judicial and government centre, Charlottetown produced most of the official news. Although there were a number of weekly newspapers, they lacked immediacy—and in any case, most of the population was illiterate. Handbills were used to announce auctions and entertainments, but they had similar limitations. Criers have commonly been found in world civilizations, since even tribal communities needed a formal, oral channel of communication with their members. However, both Mr. Hatch and the customs of "crying" that he followed derived from England.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1987
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-276
source 21
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.