Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

09_A_Prince_Edward_Island_repeal_p_29-31.pdf

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title A Prince Edward Island Repeal List for 1843
creator Punch, Terrence M.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description This Island story has its roots in Nova Scotia. One hundred and forty years ago, the Roman Catholics of Halifax, Nova Scotia, were predominantly Irish by birth or descent. A largely ethnic difference had resulted in the creation of two Roman Catholic dioceses in the colony. Cape Breton and eastern mainland Nova Scotia belonged to the Highland Scots; the Diocese of Halifax was solidly Irish. As one might expect, therefore, the local Catholic newspaper tended towards an Irish attitude in political affairs. Rather insensitively, then, has a 20th century writer, Gertrude N. Tratt, described the Register as "intended to create or foster controversy.... Frankly Irish partisan, it attacked and was attacked by the Protestant and Conservative press in the Capital."
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1986
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-266
source 20
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title A Prince Edward Island Repeal List for 1843
creator Punch, Terrence M.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description This Island story has its roots in Nova Scotia. One hundred and forty years ago, the Roman Catholics of Halifax, Nova Scotia, were predominantly Irish by birth or descent. A largely ethnic difference had resulted in the creation of two Roman Catholic dioceses in the colony. Cape Breton and eastern mainland Nova Scotia belonged to the Highland Scots; the Diocese of Halifax was solidly Irish. As one might expect, therefore, the local Catholic newspaper tended towards an Irish attitude in political affairs. Rather insensitively, then, has a 20th century writer, Gertrude N. Tratt, described the Register as "intended to create or foster controversy.... Frankly Irish partisan, it attacked and was attacked by the Protestant and Conservative press in the Capital."
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1986
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-266
source 20
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.