04_The_Heritage_of_the_highland_Scot_p_3-8.pdf

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title The Heritage of the Highland Scot in Prince Edward Island
creator Campbell, A.P.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Recently in England I heard a radio philosopher explain that man, in order to come to terms with the 20th century, must get rid of the burden of the past. This remarkable statement fails to see the point that the past is a burden only when it is not understood and is therefore not a source of wisdom. In Canada at present we are increasingly aware of the heritage we have received from our past, a heritage that we are striving to clarify and illumine through our commitment to biculturalism and more recently to multiculturalism. From a modern, purely practical point of view, a unilingual, unicultural Canada would be much easier to achieve and maintain, but it would be infinitely less rich and colourful than it is now, and it would be an infinitely less human place in which to live.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1984
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-196
source 15
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title The Heritage of the Highland Scot in Prince Edward Island
creator Campbell, A.P.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Recently in England I heard a radio philosopher explain that man, in order to come to terms with the 20th century, must get rid of the burden of the past. This remarkable statement fails to see the point that the past is a burden only when it is not understood and is therefore not a source of wisdom. In Canada at present we are increasingly aware of the heritage we have received from our past, a heritage that we are striving to clarify and illumine through our commitment to biculturalism and more recently to multiculturalism. From a modern, purely practical point of view, a unilingual, unicultural Canada would be much easier to achieve and maintain, but it would be infinitely less rich and colourful than it is now, and it would be an infinitely less human place in which to live.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1984
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-196
source 15
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.