Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

07_Deep_sea_tramps_voyage_patterns_p_24-29.pdf

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title Deep-Sea Tramps: Voyage Patterns of Island Vessels 1846 - 1890
creator Fischer, Lewis R.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description When most people interested in ships and the sea think of Prince Edward Island during the 19th century, the image which usually springs to mind is that of a "shipbuilding factory." There is some truth to this, of course, since shipbuilders, scattered around almost the entire circumference of the Island, built and launched thousands of sailing vessels during the century. But to focus solely upon shipbuilding is to ignore an important facet of the shipping industry. Throughout the century, Islanders increasingly kept more local ships for their own use. Many of these vessels were later employed in coasting trades from the Island, others were used in the deep-sea trades as well. Some of these craft were employed as "liners," traversing fixed routes on relatively constant schedules, but the vast majority were "tramps," so called because they went wherever available cargoes were to be found.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1982
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-165
source 12
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title Deep-Sea Tramps: Voyage Patterns of Island Vessels 1846 - 1890
creator Fischer, Lewis R.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description When most people interested in ships and the sea think of Prince Edward Island during the 19th century, the image which usually springs to mind is that of a "shipbuilding factory." There is some truth to this, of course, since shipbuilders, scattered around almost the entire circumference of the Island, built and launched thousands of sailing vessels during the century. But to focus solely upon shipbuilding is to ignore an important facet of the shipping industry. Throughout the century, Islanders increasingly kept more local ships for their own use. Many of these vessels were later employed in coasting trades from the Island, others were used in the deep-sea trades as well. Some of these craft were employed as "liners," traversing fixed routes on relatively constant schedules, but the vast majority were "tramps," so called because they went wherever available cargoes were to be found.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1982
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-165
source 12
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.