Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

06_The_Falmouth_passengers_p_12-19.pdf

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title The "Falmouth" Passengers
creator MacEwen, Andrew B.W.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description The Falmouth was one of the first ships—perhaps only the second—to bring substantial numbers of Scotch settlers to what is now Prince Edward Island. It was sent out by James Montgomery , Lord Advocate of Scotland, under the leadership of David Lawson, to take settlers to Montgomery's land in Lot 34 (the place later known as Stanhope or Covehead) where "there had been a French settlement and some land cleared." Lot 34, Montgomery later wrote, uis generally of a tolerable good soil and has a considerable marsh producing hay." Lawson had been recommended to Montgomery as one "acquainted with the culture and dressing of flax." An agreement between the two men was signed at Killearn, Stirlingshire, on 30 October 1769, with Lawson being described as "Tenent at Miln of Calendar near Crief." Lawson obliged himself to go to the Island of St. John the next spring, there to take charge of Montgomery's Lot 34 farm as "Grieve or Overseer," and to serve as such for seven years after his arrival. His recompense was to be one-half of the "free profites" of the farm.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1981
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-138
source 10
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title The "Falmouth" Passengers
creator MacEwen, Andrew B.W.
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description The Falmouth was one of the first ships—perhaps only the second—to bring substantial numbers of Scotch settlers to what is now Prince Edward Island. It was sent out by James Montgomery , Lord Advocate of Scotland, under the leadership of David Lawson, to take settlers to Montgomery's land in Lot 34 (the place later known as Stanhope or Covehead) where "there had been a French settlement and some land cleared." Lot 34, Montgomery later wrote, uis generally of a tolerable good soil and has a considerable marsh producing hay." Lawson had been recommended to Montgomery as one "acquainted with the culture and dressing of flax." An agreement between the two men was signed at Killearn, Stirlingshire, on 30 October 1769, with Lawson being described as "Tenent at Miln of Calendar near Crief." Lawson obliged himself to go to the Island of St. John the next spring, there to take charge of Montgomery's Lot 34 farm as "Grieve or Overseer," and to serve as such for seven years after his arrival. His recompense was to be one-half of the "free profites" of the farm.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1981
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-138
source 10
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.