Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

04_Mister_Halls_machines_p_3-7.pdf

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title Mister Hall's Machines
creator Rankin, Allan
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Islanders made more than wooden sailing ships during the last century. On their farms, and in small blacksmith, clothing, carpentry, and machine shops, a broad assortment of articles was manufactured for local use. One important aspect of this secondary industry was the making of farm implements — horse-powered machines that sowed, cut, and gathered grain, threshed and cleaned it. They are mostly derelicts now, shoved aside in barns or left to rot back in the woods. Prior to the advent of the internal combustion engine, however, these lightweight, portable implements were essential tools of agriculture. Thomas Hall, a Wilmot farmer, was exporting threshing machines of his own construction as early as 1859, and by 1890 they had established for him a national reputation.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1980
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-109
source 08
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title Mister Hall's Machines
creator Rankin, Allan
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Islanders made more than wooden sailing ships during the last century. On their farms, and in small blacksmith, clothing, carpentry, and machine shops, a broad assortment of articles was manufactured for local use. One important aspect of this secondary industry was the making of farm implements — horse-powered machines that sowed, cut, and gathered grain, threshed and cleaned it. They are mostly derelicts now, shoved aside in barns or left to rot back in the woods. Prior to the advent of the internal combustion engine, however, these lightweight, portable implements were essential tools of agriculture. Thomas Hall, a Wilmot farmer, was exporting threshing machines of his own construction as early as 1859, and by 1890 they had established for him a national reputation.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1980
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-109
source 08
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.