Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

08_Acadian_celebration_of_Mardi_Gras_p_29-32.pdf

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title Acadian Celebration of Mardi Gras
creator Carmella Arsenault
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description The Acadian population of the Atlantic Provinces has deep roots in this country. They arrived in the 17th and 18th centuries, bringing with them French traditions which they have kept alive for many generations. Their isolation, especially from the Deportation (Expulsion) of the 1750s until this century, has certainly contributed to the preservation of these traditions. In fact, the folklore of the Acadians is known to be among the richest in North America. The early Island Acadians had the reputation of being a cheerful people. In 1770 William Drummond, a British visitor to the settlement of Malpeque, noted in his diary on June 4: "At 9 went to another house where the French were convened, had a dance and spent the evening in jollity."1 At a somewhat later date another observer, S.S. Hill, noted in his A Short Account Of Prince Edward Island (London, 1839):
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1978
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-57
source 04
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title Acadian Celebration of Mardi Gras
creator Carmella Arsenault
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description The Acadian population of the Atlantic Provinces has deep roots in this country. They arrived in the 17th and 18th centuries, bringing with them French traditions which they have kept alive for many generations. Their isolation, especially from the Deportation (Expulsion) of the 1750s until this century, has certainly contributed to the preservation of these traditions. In fact, the folklore of the Acadians is known to be among the richest in North America. The early Island Acadians had the reputation of being a cheerful people. In 1770 William Drummond, a British visitor to the settlement of Malpeque, noted in his diary on June 4: "At 9 went to another house where the French were convened, had a dance and spent the evening in jollity."1 At a somewhat later date another observer, S.S. Hill, noted in his A Short Account Of Prince Edward Island (London, 1839):
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1978
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-57
source 04
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.