Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

05_The_Wreck_of_the_Phoenix_p_9-12.pdf

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title The Wreck of the Phoenix
creator Townshend, Adele
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Today, visitors to the East Point Lighthouse, at the extreme eastern end of Prince Edward Island, come away with the haunting feeling that they have been in touch with the ghosts of shipwrecked sailors. It is reassuring to see the trim white lighthouse tower and the well-kept grounds, with the keeper's children busy at play. But closer to the Point, Nature has set a more ominous stage. Along the cliff edge, an impenetrable tangle of gnarled and twisted white spruce trees forms a living bulwark against the prevailing wind and the salt spray. Off the Point, however, there is no shelter. Men and ships are at the mercy of the restless wind, tidal rips, and three reefs, the longest and most dangerous called, simply, East Point Reef. Here, the waves from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to the north break abruptly against those of the Northumberland Strait to the south, forming a long line of distorted waters over the rocky, submerged ledge of the infamous reef. A buoy, nearly two miles out, marks the end of danger.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1986
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-262
source 20
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

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title The Wreck of the Phoenix
creator Townshend, Adele
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Today, visitors to the East Point Lighthouse, at the extreme eastern end of Prince Edward Island, come away with the haunting feeling that they have been in touch with the ghosts of shipwrecked sailors. It is reassuring to see the trim white lighthouse tower and the well-kept grounds, with the keeper's children busy at play. But closer to the Point, Nature has set a more ominous stage. Along the cliff edge, an impenetrable tangle of gnarled and twisted white spruce trees forms a living bulwark against the prevailing wind and the salt spray. Off the Point, however, there is no shelter. Men and ships are at the mercy of the restless wind, tidal rips, and three reefs, the longest and most dangerous called, simply, East Point Reef. Here, the waves from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to the north break abruptly against those of the Northumberland Strait to the south, forming a long line of distorted waters over the rocky, submerged ledge of the infamous reef. A buoy, nearly two miles out, marks the end of danger.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
date 1986
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-262
source 20
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.