Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation

07_Introducing_the_striped_skunk_p_20-23.pdf

Description

View


View Document

MetaData

title Introducing the Striped Skunk
creator Curley, Rosemary
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Human memory has certain strengths, and one is the ability to recall the source of any odour, even after several decades. What exiled farm inhabitant could not identify the smell of newly turned earth, white clover, or horse manure? Still, a century ago, Prince Edward Island residents may have experienced a purer recall of the sweeter scents, for their brains were not yet cluttered with the memory of the malodorous skunk. Today no Islander can deny the familiar skunk odour. But in 1890, when naturalist Francis Bain lived and breathed pure air, he, like earlier authors who described our mammals, omitted the skunk with a clear conscience and an unsullied cerebrum.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
contributor 1985
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-225
source 17
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.

Read Online

Object Details

View

MetaData

title Introducing the Striped Skunk
creator Curley, Rosemary
subject Island Magazine
subject Prince Edward Island Museum
description Human memory has certain strengths, and one is the ability to recall the source of any odour, even after several decades. What exiled farm inhabitant could not identify the smell of newly turned earth, white clover, or horse manure? Still, a century ago, Prince Edward Island residents may have experienced a purer recall of the sweeter scents, for their brains were not yet cluttered with the memory of the malodorous skunk. Today no Islander can deny the familiar skunk odour. But in 1890, when naturalist Francis Bain lived and breathed pure air, he, like earlier authors who described our mammals, omitted the skunk with a clear conscience and an unsullied cerebrum.
publisher Prince Edward Island Museum
contributor 1985
type Document
format application/pdf
identifier vre:islemag-batch2-225
source 17
language en_US
rights Please note that this material is being presented for the sole purpose of research and private study. Any other use requires the permission of the copyright holder(s), and questions regarding copyright are the responsibility of the user.