They Made the Ultimate Sacrifice

The following men were killed during the First World War or as a result of the wounds inflicted during the war years.

Private Damien Leonard
January 27, 1894 – 1918
Cornwall
Parents: William and Rosie Annie (Campbell) Leonard

Damien was twenty-four (24) years old when he enlisted in Charlottetown on August 6, 1918. His service number was 3201501. He was 5’ 9” tall with blue eyes and black hair. He signed up with the 1st Battalion (N.S. Regiment).
He was serving in the army, Canadian Garrison Artillery, when he died in 1918 from influenza.
His parents, William and Rosie Annie remained in Cornwall until 1934. The farm had been in the family since 1799. He had six siblings but only five are listed: Vincent, Loretta, Ella, and Ernest. Private Leonard is commemorated on Page 448 of the First World War Book of Remembrance located in the Peace Tower in Ottawa.  (Click here to view the page)

*His attestation papers can be viewed by clicking here

 

Private Victor J. McDonald
October 20, 1895 – 1920
Cornwall
Parents: George and Isabel (Leonard) McDonald

Single and working as a farmer, Victor McDonald volunteered for the 105th Overseas Battalion. Twenty (20) years old, he was 5’ 8½” tall with grey eyes and dark hair. He enlisted December 15, 1915 in Charlottetown (service number 712376). Victor served in the army with the Canadian Infantry 26th Battalion (New Brunswick Regiment). Exposed to gas released by the enemy, he came home an invalid and spent the remainder of his life in the veterans’ hospital in Kentville, Nova Scotia. Shortly after the war ended, Victor succumbed to the disabling affects of gas. He died on January 6, 1920 at the age of twenty-four. His parents, as well as his siblings, George and Louis, survived him. Private McDonald is commemorated on Page 551 of the First World War Book of Remembrance located in the Peace Tower in Ottawa.  (Click here to view the page)
Victor McDonald wrote letters to his brother Leo McDonald during his time overseas and in the hospital. Twelve of these letters have been preserved. Called The Victor McDonald Collection, these letters can be viewed at
http://web.mala.bc.ca/davies/Letters.Images/V.McDonald/collection.htm

*His attestation papers can be viewed by clicking here

 

Private John Watts Sanderson
June 1, 1897 – 1918
York Point
Parents: Frank H. and Eliza May Sanderson

Private John Watts Sanderson worked at farming when he decided to volunteer with the 105th Overseas Battalion. His service number was 712460. From a large family of boys: Hammond, Franklin, George, Robert and Fulton, John Sanderson joined the service on December 16, 1916 at the age of eighteen (18). He had blue eyes, brown hair and was 5’ 7” tall.
In August 1918, Dury was behind the German defense system known as the Drocourt-Queant line. On the 2nd of September, this line was broken by the Canadian and XVII Corps, and Dury village and the hill just South (Dury Ridge) were captured. John Sanderson was serving with the Canadian Infantry 78th Battalion (Manitoba Regiment) when he died on September 2, 1918. He is buried in the Dury Mill British Cemetery in France. The cemetery began as Canadian units buried their casualties on September 5th, 1918 and closed sixteen days later.
Private Sanderson is commemorated on Page 496 of the First World War Book of Remembrance located in the Peace Tower in Ottawa. (Click here to view the page)

*His attestation papers can be viewed by clicking here

 

Private Ethan Claude White
February 7, 1881 – 1918
Cornwall
Parents: John T. and Caroline White

Ethan White was single and worked on the farm when he decided to enlist. He volunteered on November 12, 1915 at the age of thirty-three (33), enlisting with the 105th Overseas Battalion. His service number was 712238. Active in the 82nd Regiment Militia, Ethan White was 5’ 8” tall with blue eyes and brown hair.
Private White served in the Canadian Infantry 26th Battalion (New Brunswick Regiment) when killed in France. He was thirty-six (36) years of age. Ethan White is buried in the Ligny-St. Flochel British Cemetery, Averdoingt in Pas De Calais, France. The cemetery started at the beginning of April 1918 when the 7th Casualty Clearing Station came back from Tincques ahead of the German advance. Additional casualties were buried in the cemetery from Aire and Pernes.
Private White is commemorated on Page 521 of the First World War Book of Remembrance located in the Peace Tower in Ottawa.  (Click here to view the page)

*His attestation papers can be viewed by clicking here

 

Private Robert Edgar White
September 29, 1875 – 1917
Cornwall

Robert White, brother to Ethan White, was single and travelling in Alberta when he made the decision to volunteer. He enlisted on April 12, 1916 at the age of forty-one (41). He signed with the 202nd O. Battalion CEF, service number 231378, while in Edmonton, Alberta. He had grey eyes, dark brown hair and was 5’ 9½” tall. Private Robert White died on October 30, 1917 at the age of forty-two while serving with the Canadian Infantry 49th Battalion (Alberta Regiment) at Ypres, Belgium.
The 1st battle of Ypres took place during October and November 1914 when a British Expeditionary Force secured the town and pushed back the Germans. The 2nd battle began on April 1915 when the Germans released poison gas into the Allied lines north of Ypres. This was the first time gas had been used and the violence of the attack forced the Allies to withdraw.
No significant movement took place on this front until 1917, when in the Third Battle of Ypres an offensive mounted by Commonwealth forces diverted German attention away from a weakened French front further south. The attempt in June to dislodge the Germans from the Messines Ridge was a complete success, but the main assault northeastward (which began at the end of July) quickly became a dogged struggle against a determined opposition and rapidly deteriorating weather. The campaign finally ended in November with the capture of Passchendaele. Private White is buried at the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium.
Private R. White is commemorated on Page 348 of the First World War Book of Remembrance located in the Peace Tower in Ottawa.  (Click here to view the page)

*His attestation papers can be viewed by clicking here

 

Private George Elmer Yeo
April 24, 1893 – 1917
Cornwall

George Yeo was single and working as a farmer in Vernon, British Columbia when he volunteered for service with the 47th Battalion. Five foot, five inches (5’ 5”) tall with hazel eyes and dark hair, his service number was 628606.
In 1917, 100,000 troops camped among the sand dunes of Etaples. Immense concentrations of Commonwealth reinforcement camps and hospitals were in this area. The battlefields were to the north and south of Etaples. Private Yeo died in action on November 20, 1917 at the age of twenty-four (24). He served with the Canadian Machine Gun Corps. He is buried in the Etaples Military Cemetery in Pas de Calais, France. Private Yeo is commemorated on Page 354 of the First World War Book of Remembrance located in the Peace Tower in Ottawa.  (Click here to view the page)

*His attestation papers can be viewed by clicking here

 

The photos below represent each side of the WWI cenotaph in Cornwall

Side 1 Side 2 Side 3 Side 4

 

In Partnership with