The Cheese Making Process

The Cheese Making Process

In the article, “That’s the Cheese” that appeared in the September 21, 1882 issue of The Daily Examiner the author who is nameless gives a detailed account of his/her visit to the cheese factory and the cheese making process.  He/she describes it as follows (the content, including the spelling, is copied verbatim from the original article):

“The milk is then strained into a large “vat;” and as soon as the day’s supply has been received steam is applied and the temperature of the milk is raised.  The rennet is then put in; and the curdling process begins.  As soon as the curd is formed, it is cut into very small pieces by means of knives made specially for the purpose; and until it has reached the right consistency it is constantly stirred, in order that the particles may not adhere to each other.  When that time has arrived, they whey is drawn off and runs under ground to a vat, at some distance from the factory in the vicinity of a flourishing pig pen.  The curds is then transferred from the vat to the ‘sink’, where it undergoes several processes and is salted and ground.  Then it is put into cans and placed in the cheese press – a machine by means of which the operator can, with one hand, apply at the same moment a very heavy pressure to as many as ten or twelve cheeses.  They are allowed to remain in the press about twenty-two hours, and are then ready to be placed in the ‘drying room’.  When they are sufficiently dried, they are placed in the ‘cheeseboxes,’ which are made on the premises, and are sent to market.”17

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