Golding Smith

Golding Smith

Heading east from Robert Frizzell’s shop, we come to ‘Goldie’ Smith’s forge, which was located directly across the highway from the store.  The house in which Goldie lived still stands.  His forge was located at the end of his driveway.  It seems that Goldie was more in the business of repair, as not many people remember him shoeing horses.  Cornwall resident Lance Lowther can remember going into his shop as a young boy and seeing the shop full of wood and iron pieces.  He also remembers, “if you were good he might give you a dime to go over to the store and get a pop.”  Goldie worked iron, which, during those times required a forge as there was no electricity or welders!  Iron had to be heated by the fire in order to shape it or make any necessary holes.  Goldie used to make sleighs, hinges and other small parts that required bending and shaping.5  He was also known to make minor repairs to furniture.6

Golding Smith

Golding Smith is the man in the centre.  Photo courtesy of Margaret and Buddy MacKinley

* Certain mention must be made to Sam Frizzell and Fred Warren.  The names of these two men have cropped up in some sources, but very little is known about their shops’.  It is believed that their shops would have been located in same area as Golding Smith’s although pre-dating him.  Their shops were believed to have been around the Ferry Road/TransCanada intersection.  The Welsh forge was located for certain on the corner of the Ferry Road and TransCanada Highway, as shown on the Meacham atlas below

Meacham

Altered photo of Lot 32 from the Meacham Atlas, 1880

In Partnership with